26 August 2017

Living Under A Boulder

Camera Trap Codger's recent video of a Pygmy Rabbit inspired me to upload these clips of rodents at Paarl Mountain Nature Reserve.

SecaCam hidden under a huge boulder at Paarl Mountain Nature Reserve

Lets first meet the Neophobic Four-Striped Grass Mouse.

Four-Striped Grass Mouse (Streepmuis - Rhabdomys pumilio) with a skeptical glare at the camera trap

I initially placed the SecaCam HomeVista quite far back, near the edge of the boulder. From the start the mouse already didn't like its presence, but the mouse didn't like it one bit when I later moved the camera trap much deeper into the boulder's overhang.

Video: The mouse's reaction after moving the camera trap closer

The twig nest in the background doesn't belong to the mouse, but is in fact of Vlei Rat craftsmanship. I believe this particular individual is a Saunders' Vlei Rat, but it is hard to be sure from just the photographs.

Saunders' Vlei Rat (Saunders-Vleirot - Otomys saundersiae) at its nest underneath a huge boulder

From the very beginning the Saunders' Vlei Rat showed very little interest in the camera trap, even when I moved it closer to the nest. Towards the end of the camera trapping stint I captured a photograph of the rodent fixating on what I thought was the camera trap.

Is this thing edible?

The camera trap was set to take photos and videos and as it turns out the rat wasn't really interested in the camera trap at all, but rather had its eyes on fresh new shoots growing in front of and next to the camera trap.

Video: The easy going vlei rat

The vlei rat seems to be quite the thoughtful character. He gave the camera trap a good lookover when it was moved closer and then afterwards didn't seem much bothered by its presense.

Both rodent species showed the "raised forefoot" position which I learnt years ago from Codger's blog often indicates uncertainty or analyzing a situation. The mouse however only felt safe to do this the third time it encountered the camera trap.

The rodents have good reason to be cautious, there are bound to be predators on the prowl!

Large-Spotted Genet (Grootkolmuskeljaatkat - Genetta tigrina) hunting on a misty night

One Four-Striped Grass Mouse also showed some signs of parasites or disease. It had a problem with its fur.

Bare skin and dark coloration on the back of this Four-Striped Gras Mouse

I've noticed this condition quite frequently in this species, not only at Paarl Mountain. I'm not sure what causes it, but I suspect some kind of mange (parasitic mite). The other rodent species living in close proximity to the infected Four-Striped Grass Mouse usually seem more healthy.

To close things off I must admit that I'm starting to become huge fans of the entire Otomys genus (Vlei Rats). This Saunders' Vlei Rat was super charming and the Karoo Bush Rat family at Koeberg was too sweet for words. May my future hold many more Otomys-moments.

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